DateDescriptionHomilist
2020-07-0514th Sunday Rev. Msgr. Michael J. Motta, D.Min.


It has been over 100 days since we last met for Saturday/Sunday Mass. This is the 4th of July weekend. It is the day that we commemorate the birth of our country.

I would like to make some comparisons between the way that many Americans look at life and the way that we Christians should look at life.

We are in the midst of a pandemic. There are many things that we do not understand concerning COVID19. We do not know how it came about and we do not know when it will end. Many people have lost their lives because of it. What we do know is that the world will change because of it.

America has often preached that one can succeed in this life if he or she uses his talents and abilities to the utmost. I will attain my goal if I try very hard. I can be number one if I try my best.

But, Christianity recognizes the fact that life does not always work out that way. There are things in life that are much greater than I. The pandemic illustrates that fact. Sometimes, no matter how hard I try, I do not succeed.

Sometimes you suffer in life through no fault of your own. Sometimes you get laid off from your job (even though you’ve worked very hard) because your company is downsizing. Sometimes you are the victim of violence or natural disaster. Sometimes children suffer because their parents do not get along. Suffering is a part of life. You just have to look at the crucifix to appreciate that fact. Sometimes we need to take up our cross and follow in the Lord’s footsteps.

The people who lived through the Depression have a better appreciation of the fact that life is sometimes unfair. They tried to make life better for their children by giving them material things. How many times did I hear my own parents say to me, “We want you to have what we did not,” but my parents still talked about sacrifice and about building character. They wanted to make sure that my brother and I did not get spoiled.

Not everyone can be number one. Most of life is not about winning.

We need to trust in God. Say to God: “I know you are there, Lord. You have been there for me in the past when I had those dark nights and I trust that you will be there for me in the future even though I cannot feel your presence right now.”

Many times your faith will be tested. Sometimes, your prayers will be answered but not in the way you planned. I know that things work out in God’s plan for us. Sometimes, it does not happen in this life. But, it certainly will happen in the next life.

You are one of God’s children. God loves you very much. If you are faithful to God here on earth, God will be very good to you in heaven.
July 5, 2020 14th Sunday It has been over 100 days since we last met for Saturday/Sunday Mass. This is the 4th of July weekend. It is the day that we commemorate the birth of our country.

I would like to make some comparisons between the way that many Americans look at life and the way that we Christians should look at life.

We are in the midst of a pandemic. There are many things that we do not understand concerning COVID19. We do not know how it came about and we do not know when it will end. Many people have lost their lives because of it. What we do know is that the world will change because of it.

America has often preached that one can succeed in this life if he or she uses his talents and abilities to the utmost. I will attain my goal if I try very hard. I can be number one if I try my best.

But, Christianity recognizes the fact that life does not always work out that way. There are things in life that are much greater than I. The pandemic illustrates that fact. Sometimes, no matter how hard I try, I do not succeed.

Sometimes you suffer in life through no fault of your own. Sometimes you get laid off from your job (even though you’ve worked very hard) because your company is downsizing. Sometimes you are the victim of violence or natural disaster. Sometimes children suffer because their parents do not get along. Suffering is a part of life. You just have to look at the crucifix to appreciate that fact. Sometimes we need to take up our cross and follow in the Lord’s footsteps.

The people who lived through the Depression have a better appreciation of the fact that life is sometimes unfair. They tried to make life better for their children by giving them material things. How many times did I hear my own parents say to me, “We want you to have what we did not,” but my parents still talked about sacrifice and about building character. They wanted to make sure that my brother and I did not get spoiled.

Not everyone can be number one. Most of life is not about winning.

We need to trust in God. Say to God: “I know you are there, Lord. You have been there for me in the past when I had those dark nights and I trust that you will be there for me in the future even though I cannot feel your presence right now.”

Many times your faith will be tested. Sometimes, your prayers will be answered but not in the way you planned. I know that things work out in God’s plan for us. Sometimes, it does not happen in this life. But, it certainly will happen in the next life.

You are one of God’s children. God loves you very much. If you are faithful to God here on earth, God will be very good to you in heaven.
July 5, 2020 14th Sunday It has been over 100 days since we last met for Saturday/Sunday Mass. This is the 4th of July weekend. It is the day that we commemorate the birth of our country.

I would like to make some comparisons between the way that many Americans look at life and the way that we Christians should look at life.

We are in the midst of a pandemic. There are many things that we do not understand concerning COVID19. We do not know how it came about and we do not know when it will end. Many people have lost their lives because of it. What we do know is that the world will change because of it.

America has often preached that one can succeed in this life if he or she uses his talents and abilities to the utmost. I will attain my goal if I try very hard. I can be number one if I try my best.

But, Christianity recognizes the fact that life does not always work out that way. There are things in life that are much greater than I. The pandemic illustrates that fact. Sometimes, no matter how hard I try, I do not succeed.

Sometimes you suffer in life through no fault of your own. Sometimes you get laid off from your job (even though you’ve worked very hard) because your company is downsizing. Sometimes you are the victim of violence or natural disaster. Sometimes children suffer because their parents do not get along. Suffering is a part of life. You just have to look at the crucifix to appreciate that fact. Sometimes we need to take up our cross and follow in the Lord’s footsteps.

The people who lived through the Depression have a better appreciation of the fact that life is sometimes unfair. They tried to make life better for their children by giving them material things. How many times did I hear my own parents say to me, “We want you to have what we did not,” but my parents still talked about sacrifice and about building character. They wanted to make sure that my brother and I did not get spoiled.

Not everyone can be number one. Most of life is not about winning.

We need to trust in God. Say to God: “I know you are there, Lord. You have been there for me in the past when I had those dark nights and I trust that you will be there for me in the future even though I cannot feel your presence right now.”

Many times your faith will be tested. Sometimes, your prayers will be answered but not in the way you planned. I know that things work out in God’s plan for us. Sometimes, it does not happen in this life. But, it certainly will happen in the next life.

You are one of God’s children. God loves you very much. If you are faithful to God here on earth, God will be very good to you in heaven.

Back to Homilies page